Ants Stick to Cliques to Dodge Disease

Ants infected with fungal pathogens steer clear of other cliques within the colony—avoiding wider infection, and allowing for a sort of immunity. Lucy Huang reports.  | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 hours ago

Wildfires Spark Population Booms in Fungi and Bacteria

Understanding how microbial communities change after a fire can help researchers to predict how an ecosystem will recove | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 hours ago

How to Deal With People Who Talk Too Much

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen offers 5 tips for when Jeff from accounting stops by to give you the play-by-play of his morning | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 9 hours ago

Clean Power Plan Replacement Could Lead to Increased Emissions

The EPA’s proposed new rule could be worse than having no climate rule at all | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 9 hours ago

Weird Star System's Planet-Forming Disk Goes Vertical Like a Ferris Wheel

Worlds with off-kilter orbits may be much more common than previously believed | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 14 hours ago

Fukushima Residents Return Despite Radiation

Eight years after the nuclear meltdown, wary citizens are moving back to contaminated homesteads—some not by choice | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 16 hours ago

Physicists Lay Out Plans for a New Supercollider

The proposed facility would become the most powerful—and most expensive—collider ever built | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

Our Language Affects What We See

A new look at “the Russian Blues” demonstrates the power of words to shape perception | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

Physicists Lay Out Plans for a New Super-Collider

The proposed facility would become the most powerful—and most expensive—collider ever built | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

Climate Concerns Are Pushing Oil Majors to Look Beyond Fossil Fuels

Several companies are diversifying their businesses, from biofuels to electric vehicles | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

When the Mind’s Eye Is Blind

Some people find it impossible to imagine a friend’s face or their own apartment—a phenomenon named aphantasia. Scientists are beginning to tease out the brain features underlying the condition | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

Our Language Affects What We See

A new look at “the Russian Blues” demonstrates the power of words to shape perception | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

Proper Breathing Brings Better Health

Stress reduction, insomnia prevention, emotion control, improved attention—certain breathing techniques can make life better. But where do you start? | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

The Kids (Who Use Tech) Seem to Be All Right

A rigorous new paper uses a new scientific approach that shows the panic over teen screen time is likely overstated | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

Ocean Moons, Promising Targets in Search for Alien Life, Could Be Dead Inside

The interiors of Europa and other watery moons in the outer solar system might be too geologically inactive to support life | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

Disaster Response Projects Could Lose Funding to Border Wall

The White House has been looking at reallocating money earmarked to address flood risks | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

Fake Whiskeys and Octo-Ecstasy

Scientific American assistant news editor Tanya Lewis and collections editor Andrea Gawrylewski take an deeper look at two short articles from the Advances news section of the December issue, on counterfeit whiskeys and the effect of real ecstasy...on octopuses. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

Solar Farms Shine a Ray of Hope on Bees and Butterflies

A trend of planting wildflowers on solar sites could maintain habitat for disappearing bees and butterflies | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

Mistimed Migration Means Bird Death Battles

Climate change is shifting population numbers and nest building by resident and migratory birds in Europe--sometimes leading to deadly conflict. Christopher Intagliata reports. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

As the Shutdown Persists, Here Are 5 Ways It Will Impact Science

A second wave of closures looms as the government funding fight barrels towards a record-breaking fourth week | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Monogamy May Be Written in our Genes

In animal studies, a set of 24 genes involved in neural development, learning and memory, and cognition, seem to be associated with monogamy. Karen Hopkin reports. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

Erupting Black Hole Shows Intriguing “Light Echoes”

A huge flare from a black hole helps reveal how matter and energy are expelled | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

Oceans Are Warming Faster Than Predicted

Earth’s seas are absorbing excess heat 40 percent faster than previous estimates | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

The Race to Re-Learn Hemp Farming

Researchers have a lot to learn about the previously-banned crop before it flourishes on American farms | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

New App Uses Sonar to Detect Opioid Overdoses

The technology utilizes smartphone speakers and microphone to monitor breathing | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

Seeing Superman Increases Altruism

Subject who saw a Superman poster were more likely to offer help than were people who saw another image. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 6 days ago

Biotech Could Modify Trees to Protect Against Pests

Tree breeding and gene editing could help reverse the deteriorating health of U.S. forests | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 6 days ago

A Biologist Reconstructs the Grotesque Efficiency of the Nazis' Killing Machine

Lewi Stone used his statistical prowess to reveal the furious intensity of the Holocaust’s industrial-scale genocide during three months of 1942 | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 6 days ago

U.S. Emissions in 2018 Saw the Second Largest Spike Since 1996

The uptick came despite significant coal plant closures, pointing to the growing influence of other greenhouse gas sources | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 7 days ago

How to Train for a Long Distance Race

Whether it is a full marathon or a 10k, training for a race can have less than desirable consequences if you are not prepared | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 7 days ago

Testing for Caffeine Could Help Foil Fake Urine Scam

The absence of substances originating from coffee, chocolate, nicotine and blood in pee could indicate foul play | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 7 days ago

Another Casualty of the Government Shutdown: Hurricane Preparedness

Weather models are not being updated and training sessions might be canceled during the budget standoff | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 7 days ago

Inhaled RNA Might Help Heal CF

Scientists are working to correct a genetic defect in cystic fibrosis patients by having them inhale RNA. Christopher Intagliata reports. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 7 days ago

Gel Packed with Chemical "Scavengers" Protects against Sarin Gas

Nanotech particles tucked into a gel coating can prevent poisoning by deadly organophosphates for a week or more | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

NASA Exoplanet Hunter Racks Up Bizarre Worlds and Exploding Stars

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite has identified at least eight planets, including one with a mass more than 20 times that of Earth | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

Bevy of Mysterious Fast Radio Bursts Spotted by Canadian Telescope

Bounty includes second known example of a repeating burst | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

Major Missions Will Probe the Changing Climate in 2019

From melting Antarctic glaciers to solar geoengineering, here are key climate projects to watch this year | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

Alzheimer's Attack on the Brain May Vary with Race

A new study finds African–Americans with dementia have less buildup of certain toxic proteins in their brains than do whites | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

How to Stop Feeling Overly Responsible

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen offers four signs of over-responsibility, plus three ways to overcome it | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

A Touch to Remember

The sense of touch generates surprisingly powerful and long-lasting memories | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

All Sand on Earth Could Be Made of Star Stuff

Silica, a common ingredient in sand, concrete and glass, may have its origins in supernovae | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

Pluto Probe Encounters a Pristine World in the Solar System's Suburbs

Ultima Thule, the most-distant object ever visited by a spacecraft, is revealing our solar system’s deepest history—and, just maybe, revolutionizing planetary science | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

From Dams to Coastal Barriers: How the U.S. Is Fighting Flooding in 2019

Several projects face opposition from local residents and environmental groups | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 9 days ago

Fishy Smarts: Archerfish Can Recognize Human Faces in 3-D

The finding suggests this visual ability may be more “primitive” than scientists thought | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 9 days ago

Does Parkinson’s Begin in the Gut?

A growing body of evidence links the neurodegenerative disease to the gastrointestinal tract, opening new possibilities for treatment | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 10 days ago

Invisible Killers Hitchhike on Native Plant Seedlings

More than a quarter of the seedlings sampled at native plant nurseries were infected with pathogens—which could hamper restoration work. Christopher Intagliata reports. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 12 days ago

How the Partial Government Shutdown Is Hampering Climate Efforts

Travel and research by scientists with NASA, NOAA and the EPA is being impacted | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 12 days ago

It's Time to Get Arsenic and Other Toxic Substances Out of Baby Food

It’s time to get arsenic and other heavy metals out of our infants’ diets | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 12 days ago